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Archive for February, 2019

Opposition Leader Tony Abbott has taken aim at the carbon tax’s hip-pocket hit as he and the prime minister continue their nation-wide campaigns spruiking their alternative climate plans.

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As Mr Abbott started the morning with his family at the fish markets in the Greens-held seat of Melbourne, the first poll taken after the release of the government’s climate package showed almost two-thirds of people want a fresh election.

The Galaxy poll also showed 68 per cent of voters believe the carbon tax will leave them worse off, while 80 per cent said the package would have no impact on the environment and two-third of voters said it would be economically bad.

The Liberal leader told reporters later in the Labor-held seat of Isaacs it was time Prime Minister Julia Gillard tested the policy at an early election.

“There are millions of households around this country who are confused about this tax because they keep hearing from the prime minister, the treasurer, and the finance minister indications that the government doesn’t know that it’s doing,” he said.

“We know from the government’s own figures that a single income family starts to be worse off from average weekly earnings.”

Gillard’s response

Ms Gillard said she had given a commitment to run full term and by late 2013 voters would have a greater understanding of how the scheme works.

“We’ve got to get this done,” the prime minister told ABC Radio, ahead of a visit to the seat of Moreton.

“In 2013, people will have lived under the system, direct experience, real experience … and then they will be able to decide.”

Ms Gillard’s comments came as Treasurer Wayne Swan and the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission sounded a warning to businesses which hiked prices unfairly using the carbon tax as an excuse.

The commission will use its powers under the newly-introduced Australian Consumer Law to investigate claims of price gouging and prosecute any business, with the power to impose penalties of up to $1.1 million.

Mr Swan says the $23 a tonne carbon price, due to operate from July 1, 2012, will only have a 0.7 per cent impact on the cost of living.

“The commission will keep a watchful eye out for any shonky attempts to jack up prices and falsely claim it is related to the carbon price,” he said in Melbourne.

“So the ACCC will be the cop on the beat out there to ensure false claims are dealt with, and dealt with the full force of the law.”

Mr Abbott said the enforcement would not be necessary if the carbon tax did not go ahead.

“The most misleading and deceptive conduct has been by the prime minister herself,” he said.

It is highly unlikely Peter Falconio’s body will ever be found, but one Northern Territory judge believes its recovery is the only thing that will end rumours about Bradley John Murdoch’s innocence.

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Murdoch, who has consistently maintained he is innocent, is serving a life sentence for the British backpacker’s murder.

Although the Broome drug-runner’s 2005 conviction and 28-year non-parole period have been upheld on appeal, in the 10 years since Mr Falconio went missing countless conspiracy theories have emerged.

Mr Falconio and his girlfriend Joanne Lees, who were touring Australia in an orange Kombi van, were about 100km north of Ti Tree in central Australia on July 14, 2001, when a man in a white four-wheel drive gestured for them to pull over.

Ms Lees gave evidence Mr Falconio got out of the van to talk to the man, before she heard what sounded like a car backfiring.

It is believed Mr Falconio was shot there on a remote section of the desolate Stuart Highway.

Ms Lees was threatened with a gun, punched and restrained with cable-tie handcuffs before escaping and hiding among the spinifex for hours, until she waved down a passing road train.

Justice Dean Mildren, author of the book Big Boss Fella, All Same Judge, told AAP that questions were raised about the reliability of the DNA testing that helped convict Murdoch but that it wasn’t the only evidence against him.

Justice Mildren’s book, which was released this year to mark the centenary of the NT Supreme Court, contains a chapter about the legal saga.

“If the body were to be found, that would clear the matter up completely one way or another,” he said.

“If Peter Falconio was shot, the body is likely to have marks on the skeleton showing there was a bullet.

“Maybe if the bullet was still in the body when it was buried … then it would not just be beyond reasonable doubt, but beyond any doubt at all.”

Justice Mildren said authorities went to great lengths trying to find the construction worker’s body.

“The difficulty is that one of the things that can’t be excluded is that the body was taken a long way from the area before it was buried, if it was buried.

“No one knows where else to look.

“There’s always a chance that the body might turn up through accident, but I think after all this time the chances are starting to look pretty remote.”

Although Murdoch is believed to still be in the Alice Springs Correctional Centre, all the NT Department of Justice would say on Tuesday was that he is in the custody of NT Corrective Services.

A department spokeswoman said she could not provide information about what education or rehabilitation programs Murdoch was undertaking “due to privacy and security reasons”.

Justice Mildren said it was relatively rare for defendants to maintain their innocence after all avenues of appeal had been exhausted.

He said that, not only do confessions influence what sentence a guilty defendant is given, they can also increase the likelihood of their release from prison close to the expiration of the non-parole period.

“Usually a confession, depending on the nature of the confession, is an indication of remorse and contrition,” he said.

“If he’s maintained his innocence, he may think that it might help him with the parole board.

“Although, I think it would probably have the opposite effect.”

Murdoch will be 73 years old when he is eligible to apply for parole in 2031.

The nation’s consumer watchdog will be the “cop on the beat” to prevent price gouging under the government’s planned carbon pricing scheme.

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The commission will use its powers under the newly-introduced Australian Consumer Law to investigate claims of price gouging and prosecute any business, with the power to impose penalties of up to $1.1 million.

Treasurer Wayne Swan says the carbon price, due to operate from July 1, 2012, will only have a modest impact on most prices.

“The commission will keep a watchful eye out for any shonky attempts to jack up prices and falsely claim it is related to the carbon price,” he said in Melbourne.

“So the ACCC will be the cop on the beat out there to ensure false claims are dealt with, and dealt with the full force of the law.”

Commission deputy chairman Peter Kell said his organisation was ready with 20 new staff to investigate any complaints now.

The government will direct the ACCC to give the highest priority to:

* Investigate and take action against any business that makes false or misleading representations about the impact of the carbon price on the price they charge consumers;

* Educate businesses on their obligations to not make false or misleading statements to consumers about the impact of the carbon price on the price they charge consumers;

* Raise awareness among consumers by informing them that businesses are prohibited from making false statements about the impact of putting a price on pollution.

The government has provided the commission with funding of $12.8 million over four years to carry out the new role.

“We recognise the vast majority of businesses will do the right thing,” Mr Swan said.

“This funding will help stop the small number of businesses that may seek to take advantage of their customers with false and misleading claims about the impact of the carbon price.”

Treasury modelling estimates the impact of the carbon tax on prices will add 0.7 per cent to the inflation rate in 2012/13.

“The GST and related changes to the tax system pushed up prices more than three times as much as the carbon price is expected to,” Mr Swan said.

Julia Gillard and Tony Abbott have been confronted in public by critics as they continued their election-campaign-style pitch to the nation on action against climate change.

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The opposition leader started Wednesday morning with his family at the fish markets in the Greens-held seat of Melbourne, as the first poll taken after the release of the government’s climate package on Sunday showed almost two-thirds of people want a fresh election.

The Galaxy poll also showed that 68 per cent of voters believe the carbon tax will leave them worse off, while 80 per cent said the package would have no impact on the environment and two-thirds of voters said it would be economically bad.

But at a community forum later in the Labor seat of Isaacs, Mr Abbott was confronted by a Greens voter who argued the government’s plan would pump more money into renewable energy and cutting emissions than the coalition’s “direct action” policy.

Mr Abbott continued his theme of the carbon tax pushing up the cost of living and exporting jobs to Australia’s trade competitors. And he seized on the opinion poll to repeat his call for an early election to test Labor’s mandate on the carbon tax, which before the August 2010 election Ms Gillard had publicly ruled out.

“Every time prices go up, people will think carbon tax,” Mr Abbott said, forecasting public opinion over the next two years.

“Every time the government does something that they think is sneaky, they’ll think carbon tax.”

The prime minister was confronted in Brisbane by a female protester carrying a banner reading “Most incompetent government since Whitlam”, and a woman in a shop who accused her of breaking her word on the carbon tax.

When Ms Gillard tried to explain the package, the woman continued: “I’ve listened to you for months, I’ve watched you in parliament and you’re still lying.”

Ms Gillard earlier said she would not go to an early election as she had given a commitment to run full term to late 2013. “We’ve got to get this done,” the prime minister told ABC Radio, ahead of the visit to the seat of Moreton.

“In 2013, people will have lived under the system, direct experience, real experience … and then they will be able to decide.”

Ms Gillard’s comments came as Treasurer Wayne Swan and the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) sounded a warning to businesses which increased prices unfairly using the carbon tax as an excuse.

The commission will use its powers under the newly-introduced Australian Consumer Law to investigate claims of price gouging and prosecute any business, with the power to impose penalties of up to $1.1 million.

Mr Swan says the $23-a-tonne carbon price, due to operate from July 1, 2012, will only have a 0.7 per cent impact on the cost of living.

“The commission will keep a watchful eye out for any shonky attempts to jack up prices and falsely claim it is related to the carbon price,” he said in Melbourne.

Meanwhile a state-by-state breakdown of the biggest polluters – which will pay the full $23-a-tonne carbon price – shows 135 operate in NSW and the ACT, 110 in Queensland, 85 in Victoria, 75 in Western Australia, 25 in South Australia, 20 in Tasmania and five in the Northern Territory. A further 45 operate in multiple states.

Tributes have flowed in for Allan Jeans following the death of the legendary AFL Coach on Wednesday.

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Jeans, who suffered fibrosis of the lung, died after a long illness aged 77.

He was renowned during his years at St Kilda and Hawthorn as one of the league’s toughest coaches and greatest motivators.

After a 77-game playing career with St Kilda, Jeans became coach of the Saints in 1961, delivering their only flag in 1966.

Following 16 years with the club, he was appointed coach of Hawthorn in 1981 and went on to guide the side to premierships in 1983, 1986 and 1989.

Under Jeans, the Hawks dominated the competition, appearing in seven successive grand finals from 1983 to 1989 – excluding 1988 when Alan Joyce took over and won the flag.

Jeans later had a short stint at Richmond in 1992, winning only five out of 22 games.

Hawthorn star Dermott Brereton was among the players guided by Jeans and paid an emotional tribute to him.

“I spoke to him about 48 hours ago and I knew it was the last time I was ever going to speak to him,” Brereton said.

“It’s a really sad thing when somebody who’s had such a profound affect on your life says goodbye to you and you know it’s the last time.

“He stopped taking guests out at his care facility and I rang him and I told him everything I always wanted to tell him, like you wanted to tell your dad before it’s too late.

“I told him that from 15 years of age, I heard his voice more than my own father’s for the next 10 or 12 years, five or six days a week.

“And 90 per cent of it was not about football, it was about life and how you conducted yourself.”

Brereton said Jeans was the sort of coach who would try to turn a player into a good person before trying to make him a good footballer.

“(He was) the most morally sound man I’ve ever come across,” he said.

As a coach, he said Jeans “could motivate you to do stuff that I didn’t think myself or my body was possible or capable of doing.”

Western Bulldogs’ coach Rodney Eade also played under Jeans at Hawthorn.

“He had a great ability to curtail the guys with huge egos and be able to give confidence to players who probably lacked a little bit at the same time,” Eade said.

“He was very much about team and I think that was the great thing about being at Hawthorn – everyone was there for the team and Allan really drove that.

Renowned St Kilda hard man Carl Ditterich said he was “virtually stricken…I’m struck dumb, to be honest” after hearing the news.

“His influence on football has just been astounding,” Ditterich said.

Another Hawk player of the era, Robert Dipierdomenico, said Jeans had directed him towards the right path.

“I lived my way through Hawthorn but also the way Allan Jeans moulded me as a person and guided me and gave me the opportunity in life where maybe other people would have given up,” Dipierdomenico said.

Australia and Japan sparred verbally at a meeting of the International Whaling Commission (IWC), after Japan called on Australia to better protect its whaling ships from sabotage raids by anti-whaling activists.

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Confrontations with activists forced Japan to cut short its annual hunt south of Australia this year. Protesters threw paint, smoke bombs and rancid butter in bottles toward the Japanese whaling ships.

They also got a rope entangled in the propeller on a harpoon vessel, causing it to slow down.

Australia rebuffed Japan’s request, with Environment Minister Tony Burke saying that while Australia would abide by the principles of safety at sea and international maritime law, his country “simply can’t agree” to providing more protection to Japanese ships than other vessels operating in the area.

Japanese whalers regularly hunt in Antarctic waters south of Australia, a feeding ground for 80 per cent of the world’s whales, and the commission has no enforcement powers to stop them.

Japan insists the hunt is for scientific research, something anti-whaling nations dispute.

“This so-called scientific whaling lacks any scientific argument behind it,” Burke said.

“What’s going on there is commercial whaling. Australia is opposed to commercial whaling.”

Australia has launched a complaint against Japanese whaling at the International Court of Justice in The Hague, the UN’s highest court. Commercial whaling is banned by a 1986 moratorium.

Talks on allowing limited commercial whaling broke down last year, and no breakthroughs are expected at IWC talks in Jersey. Britain has proposed reforms to make the commission more transparent and effective, including by forcing governments to pay their membership fees by bank transfers, which can be easily traced, instead of cash or cheques.

The move comes in the wake of allegations last year that Japan has been using aid money and personal favours to buy votes, which Japan denies.

“I still hear that people are paying their dues in cash. I think that’s unacceptable … and leaves an organisation open to accusations,” British Fisheries minister Richard Benyon said.

“These may be perceptions not reality, but it’s something this organisation has to tackle.”

The British proposal was held up by procedural issues on Tuesday and will be re-tabled on Wednesday.

Australia will require just a draw from their final group game against Norway on Thursday (AEST) to make the quarter-finals of the women’s World Cup football tournament in

Germany.

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The Matildas moved into second spot in their four-team group on goal difference after they beat Equatorial Guinea 3-2 in Bochum on Sunday and Brazil defeated Norway 3-0 in the late group D fixture in Wolfsburg.

Norway and Australia are both on three points but the Matildas have a zero goal difference, while the Norwegians are on minus two.

Brazil, who play Equatorial Guinea in their final group game, moved onto six points and outright leadership of the group.

At Bochum, two goals in three minutes early in the second half from teenager Emily Van Egmond and substitute Lisa De Vanna ensured Australia’s domination of possession and glut of chances were reflected on the scoreboard.

However, Equatorial Guinea’s skipper and star player Anonman scored twice, each time after robbing Australian central defender Servet Unzular of possession.

Acting captain and chief playmaker Collette McCallum and Van Egmond excelled in midfield and Leena Khamis added zip up front to an Australian team featuring five changes to the side that started the opening game against Brazil.

Goalkeeper Lydia Williams replaced captain Melissa Barbieri while Khamis and Samantha Kerr replaced De Vanna and Kyah Simon up front and Tameka Butt and Caitlin Foord gave way to Sally Shipard and Lauren Colthorpe.

The Matildas made the perfect start, with Khamis scoring from close range in the eighth minute after veteran midfielder Heather Garriock had a shot parried by the goalkeeper.

Australia had a cast iron penalty claim inexplicably denied by the Hungarian referee after Equatorial Guinea defender Bruna blatantly grabbed a ball coming off her post and held it for several seconds in the first half.

Equatorial Guinea were content to sit deep and concede territory and rely on the attacking skills of their talisman Anonman.

She shot wide twice before equalising in the 21st minute, after she stripped Unzular and rounded keeper Williams.

Australia dominated possession and created several more first half chances, with McCallum hitting the bar with a free-kick.

Khamis produced a great run and cross down the left in the 48th minute to set up 17-year-old Van Egmond, who rifled home an unstoppable shot.

De Vanna, who went on at halftime for the injured Shipard, put Australia further ahead when she chested down a wonderful through ball from McCallum and slipped the ball past the goalkeeper.

Coach Tom Sermanni was happy with the result but not all aspects of his team’s performance.

“There was some very very poor passages of play that we need to tighten up on, if we want to go further in this tournament,” Sermanni said in a post-match interview on SBS.

“For 90 per cent of the second half in particular I thought we played very very well but there are some aspects of the game that we need to sort out before Norway.”

He was diplomatic and philosophical about the refereeing.

“I’ll take the referee out of the game, it’s not just about he referees, we’ve got to look at how we perform and how we play.”

Love was captain in 2012 when the United States were on the wrong end of one of the greatest comebacks in the tournament’s 80-plus-year history that was dubbed the “Miracle at Medinah.

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The 50-year-old former PGA Championship winner said he regrets not getting advice advice from those with Ryder Cup experience before his first stint as captain.

“We need to include as many people as we can that have Ryder Cup experience,” Love said during his introductory news conference.

“I talked to almost all my former captains, a lot of other captains, and I stressed to them that I was going to lean on them more this time because I made a mistake.

“That’s the biggest thing. We are trying to build a future here and using past captains’ and past players’ experience is going to be a big part of this new culture.”

While words such as “family” and “business plan” were sprinkled throughout Love’s introductory news conference with the United States trying to find the team spirit and planning that many feel was missing from recent showings, the new captain doesn’t plan a radical approach.

“I don’t think that we have to make massive changes. We have to make some small changes that add up to half a point here or half a point there,” he said.

Love said practice time and a focus on matchplay strategies ahead of the biennial competition would be vital and made clear that he took the job on the condition that he had backing from senior players as well as PGA of America officials.

“I can be a good leader as long as I have these guys behind me. I looked at every one of them. I said, ‘if you guys have my back on this, I am willing to do it again. I can’t go in and do it on my own,'” said Love, who played in six consecutive Ryder Cups from 1993.

“We are building a team of captains. We are building a family that is going to pull together”.

(Editing by Frank Pingue)

A poll of Christchurch residents has revealed half plan to leave New Zealand’s shaky city, or would if they could afford to.

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The findings of an online news poll have delivered more bad news on Christchurch’s dwindling population in the wake of three major earthquakes.

The South Island city was hit by a damaging 7.1-magnitude quake last September, followed by the devastating shallow 6.3-magnitude jolt on February 22, which killed 181 people and felled most of the picturesque CBD.

A violent aftershock of the same magnitude last month killed one man and dredged up silt for a third time, leaving many strung-out residents in disbelief.

Exit figures released last month showed a record 3,000 Christchurch people emigrated to Australia and other overseas destinations between February and May to escape the instability.

An unscientific poll of 40,000 residents by the local Press newspaper has found that 21 per cent of respondents are planning to leave, while another 26 per cent would if it wasn’t for their properties or jobs.

About 13 per cent said they didn’t know what to do.

Just 36 per cent were adamant they didn’t want to go.

The city’s charismatic mayor Bob Parker has said he’s not concerned about an exodus, arguing that “the vast majority of people in this city love it.”

“We know we will get through this stage. We will rebuild our communities. Some may not be in the same places though,” he told journalists after the latest major aftershock.

Families that plan to leave are reportedly facing a backlash from fellow residents angry they have “given up” on the city.

“Goodbye and don’t bother coming back when things come right,” one commented on the Press article.

“We don’t need the likes of you who run when things get tough.”

The government’s proposed new border protection supremo will have the same standing as Australia’s top military and police officers.

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The Australian Border Force Commissioner will command a new, front-line operational force that will enforce customs and immigration laws and protect Australia’s borders, Immigration and Border Protection Minister Peter Dutton told parliament on Wednesday.

The commissioner will have the same standing as other heads of key national security related agencies, such as the Australian Federal Police Commissioner and the Chief of the Defence Force, he said.

Mr Dutton was introducing legislation setting up the office of the new commissioner.

The Border Force that will come under the commissioner will include airport and port staff, immigration detention centre personnel with expanded powers to use force, and officers who investigate illicit goods and illegal visitors.

It will also include overseas-based officers working with regional neighbours to “secure Australia’s maritime zone, prevent and deter illegal arrivals and the movement of prohibited goods”.

The commissioner will also be the Comptroller-General of Customs.

In separate legislation, onshore and Christmas Island immigration detention centre officers will be given clearer grounds for the use of force.

Mr Dutton said this followed a 2011 report into disturbances at Christmas Island and Villawood detention centres.

He said centre staff now had to rely on limited common law authority to justify using force.

Under the proposed change, “reasonable force” may be used to protect a person’s life, health or safety; or maintain the good order, peace or security of the facility.

But it doesn’t allow hunger strikers to be force fed.

Officers will be immune from court proceedings provided they acted in good faith.

Mr Dutton said the centres hold an increasing number of detainees who present “behavioural challenges”.

These include a growing number of people who’ve received adverse security assessments, people convicted of serious criminal offences and members of outlawed motorcycle gangs.

Debate on the Australian Border Force Bill 2015 and the Migration Amendment (Maintaining the Good Order of Immigration Detention Facilities) Bill 2015 was adjourned.